renew

As curator for the Stairwell Gallery I am absolutely thrilled with the work BOXCARSIX produced in response to the themes embedded in the Easter story.  Their work brings a depth of understanding and originality  to a time of year that like Christmas, can easily be taken for granted.
Read more about the work here, and follow BOXCARSIX on Instagram.

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artist pics

The artist Heather Barr visited my show and took these lovely pictures. ( The Other Side of War is showing at the Fifty Fifty Art Collective at 2516 Douglas Str. Victoria BC, Canada.)

snapshot

I am thankful to be emerging as an artist amongst others. I was invited to participate in snapshot- an opening installation for arc.hive, a new artist run centre in Victoria, BC  ( Canada. ) The show featured  visual, writing and musical notebook pages. What a rich show it was. I loved looking at every single page. Such original ideas and imaginative ways of making them come alive. Gorgeous and quirky and interesting. The artists’ studios were open as well with wonderful work on view.
(the pics feature the sections of the installation in which the pages of my sketch book were included.)

I spent an afternoon doing a study from one of my own photos. I started off with watercolour and soon found a new respect for watercolour florals! Thankfully white gesso rescued the picture and I am not unhappy  with the result. A bit more needs to be done, but that’s enough of experimenting for today!

Looking for inspiration I found this wonderful picture by Fantin -Latour:
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Here is artist Clare Thomas with my installation of her work. Clare’s drawings are about the fragility of memory, and are being shown in the Stairwell Gallery– a space at St Philip Church which is set aside to show art, and which I have the privilege to curate.  It is wonderful that the minister, Christopher Page is so supportive, and the congregation appreciative of emerging, experimental and contemporary work. Art doesn’t have to be religious in order to be a sacred expression of life.

(The gallery is open for viewing 9am-noon, Monday to Friday and by appt on Saturday, and if you don’t mind the hubbub of church- on Sunday mornings as well.  At 2928 Eastdowne at the corner of Neil street, Victoria, BC, Canada.)

artful weekend

Well, now to do the dishes! I had a fulfilling weekend with wonderful art and artists. Yesterday, an afternoon with the gorgeous Jill Ehlert and Natasha van Netten; this afternoon, installing the work of 3 artists in the Stairwell Gallery at St Philip. ( more pictures to come )

small worries

I had gone to bed worried about 2 things :

1) Is my work large or dramatic enough to say anything about war? Many drawings are small, in size  and in subject: mothers and children who were close to home and did not have the ability or luxury to think in terms of the big picture.

2) Why am I putting out work about war and not work that is more obviously what people might want to buy, or about the beauty of the world or work that is easier to look at, I love abstract and sketching from life, why am I not leading with that?

In the morning I read an article about June Leaf.  Learning about her work seemed like a reply to my worries. Her work is small, it was close to home, yet it contains the whole drama of life. Both June Leaf’s work and this quote from the article reassured my doubts about my work:

“When you ask an artist why they make work, they might respond with: “because I have no choice”. For people outside the art world this doesn’t always make sense. Artists are referring to an inner drive that compels them to make work. This explains why artists might make art despite no evidence of exhibition or sales. People start off making art for all kinds of reasons: pleasure, amusement, approval, fame and money to name a few; however, what keeps them making work over an extended period of time is usually an inexplicable need to create.” ~ Wendy Welch

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June Leaf, Woman Carrying Infant Upstairs, 2011, acrylic on paper on tinplate, 11 x 12.5 inches.

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