renew

As curator for the Stairwell Gallery I am absolutely thrilled with the work BOXCARSIX produced in response to the themes embedded in the Easter story.  Their work brings a depth of understanding and originality  to a time of year that like Christmas, can easily be taken for granted.
Read more about the work here, and follow BOXCARSIX on Instagram.

18198662_1166219580166745_2011876813071030966_n

ink and roses

The symbol of love, the rose is also the symbol of struggle and suffering; of being brave and facing the dark. Look how it is used as a motif in fairy tales- the rose that precipitates the dark tale of the Beauty and the Beast; the prince who wakes the Sleeping Beauty has to find his painful way through a wall of briar roses, the young price who wishes to rescue Rupunzel falls on a rose bush and is blinded; the roses that bloom red and one white at the very end of suffering in the story of the Wild Swans. In my reading about those who faced the fascist regime in Germany it also became a symbol of resistance.

snapshot

I am thankful to be emerging as an artist amongst others. I was invited to participate in snapshot- an opening installation for arc.hive, a new artist run centre in Victoria, BC  ( Canada. ) The show featured  visual, writing and musical notebook pages. What a rich show it was. I loved looking at every single page. Such original ideas and imaginative ways of making them come alive. Gorgeous and quirky and interesting. The artists’ studios were open as well with wonderful work on view.
(the pics feature the sections of the installation in which the pages of my sketch book were included.)

little saints

As I work on these portraits I think of sculptures of saints on old cathedrals, I think of the churches blackened by fire and think about the story of Christmas in which the light of  the world came into the dark as a child- and the dark did not overcome it.

new-pictures-november-2016-004-copy
work in progress, with “light bulb baby” to the left, my studio mascot who watches over me

abstract ideas

At the end of July, I took a weekend workshop on abstract painting at the Vancouver Island School of Art. Our instructor was the kind and fascinating John Luna. We were taught 3 approaches for developing ideas for abstract work.
Being more comfortable with drawing materials, I often felt frustrated, though I found myself intrigued and decided that my summer goal would be 8 more paintings based on what I had learnt in the workshop. Here is a glimpse of what I accomplished. I am pleased I persisted despite being out of my comfort zone (working with colour, on canvas, with paint.)  Some of these pieces feel resolved, some are not, but all of them are inspiration for more paintings.

small worries

I had gone to bed worried about 2 things :

1) Is my work large or dramatic enough to say anything about war? Many drawings are small, in size  and in subject: mothers and children who were close to home and did not have the ability or luxury to think in terms of the big picture.

2) Why am I putting out work about war and not work that is more obviously what people might want to buy, or about the beauty of the world or work that is easier to look at, I love abstract and sketching from life, why am I not leading with that?

In the morning I read an article about June Leaf.  Learning about her work seemed like a reply to my worries. Her work is small, it was close to home, yet it contains the whole drama of life. Both June Leaf’s work and this quote from the article reassured my doubts about my work:

“When you ask an artist why they make work, they might respond with: “because I have no choice”. For people outside the art world this doesn’t always make sense. Artists are referring to an inner drive that compels them to make work. This explains why artists might make art despite no evidence of exhibition or sales. People start off making art for all kinds of reasons: pleasure, amusement, approval, fame and money to name a few; however, what keeps them making work over an extended period of time is usually an inexplicable need to create.” ~ Wendy Welch

leaf1_785_1000_90
June Leaf, Woman Carrying Infant Upstairs, 2011, acrylic on paper on tinplate, 11 x 12.5 inches.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑